The Heiress Effect (The Brothers Sinister #2) by Courtney Milan


The Heiress Effect (The Brothers Sinister Book 2)

Synopsis:

Miss Jane Fairfield can’t do anything right. When she’s in company, she always says the wrong thing—and rather too much of it. No matter how costly they are, her gowns fall on the unfortunate side of fashion. Even her immense dowry can’t save her from being an object of derision.

And that’s precisely what she wants. She’ll do anything, even risk humiliation, if it means she can stay unmarried and keep her sister safe.


Mr. Oliver Marshall has to do everything right. He’s the bastard son of a duke, raised in humble circumstances—and he intends to give voice and power to the common people. If he makes one false step, he’ll never get the chance to accomplish anything. He doesn’t need to come to the rescue of the wrong woman. He certainly doesn’t need to fall in love with her. But there’s something about the lovely, courageous Jane that he can’t resist…even though it could mean the ruin of them both.

Review:

Man The Heiress Effect is just as good or maybe even better than the first book in the series! I have to say Courtney Milan is quickly turning into a new favorite author. These books are just so much fun and I love them so much!

I loved The Heiress Effect. I loved Jane sooo much! She was so much fun to read! She would go on my list of favorite female leads, which really only has maybe 3 people. I usually don't connect that much or really remember the female leads in books. I associate much more with the male characters and have a long list of favorite for that category, but the females I just don't have that same connection with. I am not sure why, but that is the way it is. But Jane was different. I loved her so much I could have hated the guy and still loved the book. She is that amazing. Oh, she is great.

So Jane cannot get married. She needs to stay unmarried to continue living with her uncle and help her sister who needs her around. The uncle feels like Jane is a bad influence, but he feels like he has to let her live there until marriage. If she gets a legitimate marriage proposal she must accept it and that will take her away from her sister. So what does she do? She dresses in the most outrageously hideous dresses that kind of blind people and make her hard to look at. She talks out of turn and says things that are not quite appropriate, but she does so in a way in which it is like she doesn't know what she is saying so no one can get too angry with her. It is hilarious! I absolutely love it!

Oliver knows what it is like to not fit in with this crowd. He spent many years in school trying to learn how to be quiet and just bide his time. He has political aspirations and even though he is drawn to Jane he cannot be with her. I mean she is not what he needs to get ahead with the high society crowd. She is loud and outlandish and she would never be that docile little wife that he needs. He does however become her friend and oh it was great. He knows what she is doing and it is just nice to see her have someone on her side. Oliver, for all of his resistance, cares for Jane and tries to help her out however he can. He does have some struggles and it was kind of ridiculous reading him and what he should or might do in the situations he finds himself. It was like he had no control over himself and it just amused me greatly.

Through it all Oliver and Jane become closer and they help each other with their problems. It was such a great read. There were many bumps along the road and Jane really lets Oliver have it when she should and it was just great. Watching the two of them figure out how to be together was awesome. Jane is just such an amazing character. So strong and not willing to really change for anyone. She will do what she wants or what she feels she needs to, not what you want her to. Loved her so much. Loved this story.

Rating: ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

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